Naltrexone For Treating Alcohol Use Disorder (or if you drink too much /too often)

Naltrexone was initially used to treat opioid addiction, including heroin treatment. Recovering addicts taking Naltrexone no longer experienced the pleasurable sensations association with opioid use, and were, therefore, less motivated to continue drug abuse. It was discovered that the same was true for alcoholics. Although the exact mechanism is not entirely understood, the brain interacts… The post Naltrexone For Treating Alcohol Use Disorder (or if you drink too much /too often) appeared first on .

Naltrexone was initially used to treat opioid addiction, including heroin treatment. Recovering addicts taking Naltrexone no longer experienced the pleasurable sensations association with opioid use, and were, therefore, less motivated to continue drug abuse. It was discovered that the same was true for alcoholics. Although the exact mechanism is not entirely understood, the brain interacts with alcohol in a very similar manner to how it reacts with opioids, and Naltrexone also suppresses the euphoria and pleasurable sensations of alcohol. Alcoholics no longer receive a “reward” for drinking once they are on Naltrexone and are therefore less likely to continue consumption.

Although Naltrexone has a lengthy history of success in treating alcoholism, it is not sufficient when taken alone. Naltrexone does not reduce the cravings for alcohol, nor does it reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Naltrexone is most effective when taken in concert with other forms of treatment, including other medications, therapy, counseling, and 12-step programs. One area where Naltrexone has proven especially useful is in the treatment of alcoholics who have relapsed.

Two medications, Naltrexone and Acamprosate, reduce cravings for alcohol by fine-tuning the brain’s chemical reward system. They have been approved for treating alcoholism for over a decade.

Less than a third of all people with alcohol problems receive treatment of any kind, and less than 10 percent are prescribed medications.

Naltrexone is taken once daily and Acamprosate is taken thrice daily making it a little inconvenient.  Some patients experience side effects of nausea, decreased appetite and fatigue.

At Aayu Clinics, we have a compassionate approach to the management of alcohol-use disorder.  We would like to help you.

Take the next step!  Schedule your appointment today .  You can also call us at 773-227-3669. We look forward to taking care of you.

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